Iowa Should Move on From Kirk Ferentz Over Bullying Scandal

Kirk Ferentz has come under fire due to various allegations of bullying made against his coaching staff by former players.
Kirk Ferentz has come under fire due to various allegations of bullying made against his coaching staff by former players. | Quinn Harris/Getty Images

Longtime Iowa head coach Kirk Ferentz and his football team are currently in hot water after allegations emerged from former Hawkeye player Jack Kallenberger, who states that he was bullied by the coaching staff because of his ADHD.

Kallenberger detailed these incidents in a Sunday tweet, alleging that one coach referred to him as "simple Jack," and that other coaches talked about his "lack of intelligence."

If what Kallenberger says is true, it's hard to imagine Ferentz being able to continue as head coach in Iowa City.

Perhaps the most important allegation here is one made against Hawkeyes strenth and conditioning coach, Chris Doyle, who's accused of speaking abusively about Kallenberger's perceived intelligence. Doyle has had allegations made against him by former Iowa players accusing him of racial bias.

These former players say that this culture permeated throughout the program and caused them to "walk around the football facility on eggshells."

Ferentz, the longest-tenured coach in all of major college football, published a video statement yesterday in which he announced that Doyle will be placed on administrative leave while an indepedent review is conducted. But this all may be too little, too late.

Despite the slew of allegations coming from former players, Doyle maintains his innocence, stating that he never engaged in any sort of bullying or racially biased behavior.

Allegations of racism are not only just plaguing Iowa, but Clemson as well, with a former Tigers player revealing that an assistnat coach directed a racist remark at him. Unreported racial abuse is clearly not a done-and-dusted issue around college football.

If these allegation prove true and Ferentz makes the decision to dismiss Doyle, it will not change the fact that he allowed his program to develop a toxic culture. As a result, despite his high standing with the athletic department, university, and fan base, Ferentz and Iowa must part ways and begin to build a totally new culture around the program.