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AP Writer Suggests Antonio Brown's Entire NFL Career Could Be Over

FOXBOROUGH, MASSACHUSETTS - SEPTEMBER 08: A detail of a sign for Antonio Brown (not pictured) during the game between the New England Patriots and the Pittsburgh Steelers at Gillette Stadium on September 08, 2019 in Foxborough, Massachusetts. (Photo by Adam Glanzman/Getty Images)
Adam Glanzman/Getty Images

The inevitable was confirmed on Friday when it was announced that the New England Patriots were moving on from Antonio Brown less than two weeks after he signed with the franchise.

The transaction was expected given the sheer volume of disturbing allegations against the embattled wideout, but the the final nail in the coffin later this week when it was revealed that Brown purportedly sent a series of threatening text messages to one of his accusers. It's an ugly predicament, and one that is leaving pundits, skeptics, and fans alike pondering when the seven-time Pro Bowler will play another down in the NFL. Well, Associated Press columnist Barry Wilner believes that it's possible that day never comes at all.

Wilner brings up a valid pointer by analyzing Brown's failed marriage in Foxborough: if not in New England, then where else?

The Pats almost pride themselves, whether they like to admit it or not, on scooping up league rejects and deploying them as key components to a championship run. If they couldn't even swallow the burden of employing the Hall of Fame-level talent, who will?

Should the Central Michigan product be found liable for what he's been accused of -- he's alleged to have committed everything from unwanted sexual advances to rape -- the backlash a team would receive after signing him would be insurmountable. Even if he was hypothetically "proven" innocent, what organization would voluntarily welcome the repeated headaches and erratic, bizarre, selfish behavior?

It seems like yesterday that Brown was being lambasted for something as meager as causing an uproar in the Steelers locker room. Now, he's on the path to becoming one of the NFL's most infamously wasted talents.