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6 NBA Players Who Shockingly Never Made an All-Star Game

Mike Conley
Utah Jazz PG Mike Conley has never made an All-Star Game | Tim Warner/Getty Images

The NBA never fails to infuriate its fan base with maddening All-Star snubs. In 2020, players like Devin Booker (until Damian Lillard's untimely groin injury), Bradley Beal, and Zach LaVine were the most notable studs left off the rosters.

Because those snubs are so egregious, it really makes you wonder what borderline great players were never named to an All-Star Game throughout their career. In honor of All-Star Weekend officially arriving, let's highlight the best players to never achieve All-Star status.

6. Mike Bibby

Mike Bibby, former Sacramento Kings point guard.
Mike Bibby, former Sacramento Kings point guard.

Mike Bibby was widely-regarded as one of the NBA's best point guards in the mid-2000s. Unfortunately, he fell victim to the Western Conference being absolutely loaded with elite guards. The Arizona product's career numbers wont jump off the page, but his five-year stretch from 2002-2007 saw him average 18 points, 5.5 assists, and 3.3 rebounds per game . Bibby's best season came in 2004, where he logged 19.6 points, 6.8 assists, 4.2 rebounds, and 1.6 steals on 44.3% shooting. Those are All-Star-caliber tallies.

5. Lamar Odom

Former Los Angeles Lakers forward Lamar Odom
Former Los Angeles Lakers forward Lamar Odom

Don't let Lamar Odom's recent substance abuse problems distract you from the fact that he was one of the NBA's most underrated ballers for an extended period of time. In his prime, Odom was a point-forward during which he compiled averages of 15.5 points, 9.9 rebounds, and 4.3 assists per game. Unfortunately for the Candy Man, he was almost always playing second-fiddle, whether it be to Elton Brand, Dwyane Wade, or Kobe Bryant. In his 14 seasons in the league, Odom never once featured on an All-Star roster.

4. Mike Conley

Mike Conley
Utah Jazz PG Mike Conley | Abbie Parr/Getty Images

Mike Conley was the glue of the Grizzlies' notorious "Grit and Grind" mentality in the mid-2010s that made Memphis a daunting opponent to square up against in the postseason. Like many exceptional guards before him, however, Conley's All-Star aspirations have fallen victim to the Western Conference being regularly loaded at the guard position. Now looking a bit past his prime, the window for Conley to make an All-Star game seems to be shut.

3. Jamal Crawford

Jamal Crawford
Former NBA sharpshooter Jamal Crawford | Michael Reaves/Getty Images

Jamal Crawford might just go down as the greatest sixth-man of all-time. However, like Lou Williams, the disadvantage of coming off the bench makes it very difficult to accumulate recognition as an All-Star. To think that his ankle-snatching handles and elite tendency to knock down contested jumpers never graced an All-Star court is nothing short of infuriating. Crawford deserved better.

2. Al Jefferson

Al Jefferson
Former Indiana Pacers C Al Jefferson | Gene Sweeney Jr./Getty Images

We will never wrap our minds around the sheer contempt that Al Jefferson endured across his career. For an eight-year stretch, Jefferson was one of the NBA's most dominating forces on the low post. From 2007-2012, Big Al averaged 19.6 points and 10.1 rebounds per game. His best campaign came in 2008-09, where he produced 23.1 points and 11 rebounds. Jefferson's production warranted several All-Star nods. Instead, he inexplicably went 14 seasons without one.

1. Monta Ellis

Monta Ellis
Former Golden State Warrior and Indiana Pacer Monta Ellis | Thearon W. Henderson/Getty Images

Before Steph Curry and Klay Thompson formed the Splash Brothers tandem, Curry and Monta Ellis were busy lighting up Oracle Arena in Golden State's backcourt. One could argue that the Warriors' shortcomings with Ellis running the show resulted in him failing to make an All-Star team, but Trae Young was just named a starter with the bottom-barrel Hawks. Ellis could average 20 points in his sleep, and the fact that he was never awarded the nod, particularly in 2009-10 -- where he averaged 25 points, 5.3 assists, 4 rebounds, and 2.2 steals on 44.9% shooting -- is unforgivable.