Immediately after Maryland head coach D.J. Durkin was put on administrative leave for the damning reports that he created a toxic environment for the university's football team, many around the NCAA community believed his fate was already sealed.


Reports are surfacing that the Board of Regents has swiftly come to a decision that will massively shake up the program and remove key people in positions of power of Maryland athletics.


Not only is Durkin expected to be out, so to may be the school's President and Athletic Director. 

The Board had to determine two positions and the level of Durkin's responsibility for both. The first being the tragic death of 19-year-old offensive lineman Jordan McNair after a May 29 workout hosted by Durkin where the young man suffered critical heat stroke with a body temperature of 106 degrees after being forced to run a dangerous amount of sprints. 


The second, testimony from both past and present staff/players, who accused Durkin of being part of a toxic and volatile environment where players were verbally abused and taunted in addition to questionable and unreasonable methods implemented by trainers Durkin hired to keep players in shape.

It would appear the Board also believes the AD and President either knew about what was happening with the football program and failed to report it, learned of it and didn't react accordingly, or simply didn't do enough to prevent it from happening in the first place. 

Perhaps the final straw was the parents of McNair coming forward in an emotional interview with Good Morning America stating that Durkin should never be allowed to work with kids.


Though Durkin has received support, specifically that of South Carolina Gamecocks coach Will Muschamp, the overwhelming situation that the university is mourning the loss of a fallen student, teammate and human being creates a situation that makes it nearly impossible for Durkin to be accepted back to the program with open arms.


For that, the University of Maryland has no choice but to move forward, and that is what they are doing.