21 Most Dominant Power-Hitting Seasons in Baseball History

Next0 / 21
DETROIT, MI - JUNE 3: Miguel Cabrera #24 of the Detroit Tigers singles to right field during the eighth inning of the game against the Toronto Blue Jays at Comerica Park on June 3, 2018 in Detroit, Michigan. (Photo by Leon Halip/Getty Images)

Chicks dig the long ball. It's true, google it. Everyone loves to see a good dinger be hit out of the ballpark. Feel like reliving the glory days? Here is a list of the 20 Most Dominant Power-Hitting Seasons in Baseball History.

Next0 / 21
Next1 / 21

21. Aaron Judge, 2017

AVG: .284

HR: 52

RBI: 114

SLG%: .627

OPS: 1.049


Right out of the gate, Aaron Judge was a hitting machine. The 6-7 outfielder blasted 52 home runs, which broke Mark McGwire's record for most home runs as a rookie. He has quickly become a fan favorite and a New York icon for years to come.

Next1 / 21
Next2 / 21

20. Albert Pujols, 2003

AVG: .359

HR: 43

RBI: 124

SLG%: .667

OPS: 1.106


It is crazy to think that Albert Pujols is now 38 years old and still playing at a high level. While he has had multiple seasons worthy of a mention here we look at the 2003 season. While he tied for 4th with home runs, he led the National League in batting average, RBIs, hits (212) and doubles (51).


15 years later, he is still making contact with the LA Angels.

Next2 / 21
Next3 / 21

19. Stan Musial, 1948

AVG: .376

HR: 39

RBI: 131

SLG%: .702

OPS: 1.152


Stan Musial was one of the best players in the game during the 1940s and his 1948 season was no different. Musial was named MVP and led the league in every batting category outside of home runs, which placed him 5th.

Next3 / 21
Next4 / 21

18. Giancarlo Stanton, 2017

AVG: .281

HR: 59

RBI: 132

SLG%: .631

OPS: 1.007


We all knew Giancarlo Stanton was a special payer in Miami but in 2017 he showed what he was all about. He battling average is lower than everyone else on this list, but when he made contact, the ball was likely gone.

 

He 2017 earned him MVP honors as well as a nice new start with the New York Yankees.

Next4 / 21
Next5 / 21

17. Todd Helton, 2000

AVG: .372

HR: 42

RBI: 147

SLG%: .698

OPS: 1.162


Todd Helton spent his entire career with the Colorado Rockies and his 2000 was one of his best. While he tied for 10th in home runs, he led the league in just about every other batting category.

Next5 / 21
Next6 / 21

16. Manny Ramirez, 1999

AVG: .333

HR: 44

RBI: 165

SLG%: .663

OPS: 1.105


Manny Ramirez had a great career in the MLB and his 1999 season was no different. While he was tied for 3rd in home runs, he was first in RBI, SLG% and OPS. Ramirez also won the Silver Slugger and Hank Aaron award.

Next6 / 21
Next7 / 21

15. Ryan Howard, 2006

AVG: .313

HR: 58

RBI: 149

SLG%: .659

OPS: 1.084


Ryan Howard spent his entire playing career with the Philadelphia Phillies and was an absolute beast in 2006. His 56 home runs and 149 RBIs led the league, while his slugging percentage and OPS were second.


He was awarded the 2006 NL MVP as well as the Silver Slugger and Hank Aaron awards.

Next7 / 21
Next8 / 21

14. Miguel Cabrera, 2012

AVG: .330

HR: 44

RBI: 139

SLG%: .606

OPS: .999


In 2012, Miguel Cabrera won the Triple Crown, a feat no player had accomplished in 45 years. This means that he led the league in home runs, RBIs and batting average. Outside of that, he also led the American League in slugging percentage and OPS.


It comes to no surprise that he won the AL MVP as well as the Silver Slugger and Hank Aaron awards.

Next8 / 21
Next9 / 21

13. Willie Mays, 1965

AVG: .317

HR: 52

RBI: 112

SLG%: .645

OPS: 1.043


Willie Mays is considered one of the best baseball players of all time. The 24-time All-Star won two MVP awards including on in the 1965 season. He led the '65 season in home runs, SLG% and OPS.

Next9 / 21
Next10 / 21

12. Frank Robinson, 1966

AVG: .316

HR: 49

RBI: 122

SLG%: .637

OPS: 1.047


Frank Robinson is one of the few players in the history of the MLB to win the Triple Crown. In addition to his fantastic individual season, he also led the Baltimore Orioles to the 1966 World Series and earned MVP honors.


Sounds like the perfect season for any baseball player.

Next10 / 21
Next11 / 21

11. Alex Rodriguez, 2007

AVG: .314

HR: 54

RBI: 156

SLG%: .645

OPS: 1.067


A-Rod was a three-time MVP and one of those seasons was 2007. While he did not have one of the top batting averages in the MLB, he did lead in home runs, RBIs, SLG% and OPS.

Next11 / 21
Next12 / 21

10. Sammy Sosa, 2001

AVG: .328

HR: 64

RBI: 160

SLG%: .437

OPS: 1.174


Sammy Sosa was a home run monster for the Chicago Cubs. He was named an All-Star in 2001, in addition to leading the league in RBIs and being named a Silver Slugger. 


His 2001 season is shadowed by someone else on this list, but still should be recognized regardless.

Next12 / 21
Next13 / 21

9. Ted Williams, 1949

​AVG: .343

HR: 43

RBI: 159

SLG%: .650

OPS: 1.141


Ted Williams, much like Stan Musial mentioned earlier, was a star in 1940s. His 43 home runs were good to lead the league, while also leading in SLG%, OPS and tying for RBI's. 


His dominant play earned him MVP honors in 1949.

Next13 / 21
Next14 / 21

8. Mickey Mantle, 1956

AVG: .353

HR: 52

RBI: 130

SLG%: .705

OPS: 1.169


Mickey Mantle completely dominated the batter's box during the 1956 season, leading in every major batting category. 


This impressive season earned him the AL MVP, AL Triple Crown and a World Series win in 1956.

Next14 / 21
Next15 / 21

7. Babe Ruth, 1921

AVG: .378

HR: 59

RBI: 171

SLG%: .846

OPS: 1.359


Babe Ruth is arguably one of the best baseball players of all-time and his 1921 season is just another example. 


In his second season with the New York Yankees, he led the league in home runs, RBIs, SLG% and OPS. More impressive? The stats that followed behind Ruth in those categories were 34 HRs, 129 RBIs, .606 SLG% and 1.051 OPS. Ruth was on a whole other level.

Next15 / 21
Next16 / 21

6. Roger Maris, 1961

AVG: .269

HR: 61

RBI: 141

SLG%: .620

OPS: .993

Roger Maris made MLB history, hitting 61 home runs in his famous 1961 season. Maris would go on to win the MVP award, and managed to add 141 RBIs to his tally as well. Maris' 1961 year will go down as one of the all-time greats, and rightly so.

Next16 / 21
Next17 / 21

5. Barry Bonds, 2002

AVG: .370

HR: 46

RBI: 110

SLG% .799

OPS: 1.381


Everyone has their differences with Bonds now but at the time everyone wanted to watch him bat. This guy was a hitting machine. While there are many different seasons to consider here, in 2002 due to he won the NL Batting Title, NL MVP and the Hank Aaron Award.


His 2002 SLG% is the fifth highest for a single season, while his OPS is the third highest for a single season.

Next17 / 21
Next18 / 21

4. Ken Griffey Jr., 1997

AVG: .304

HR: 56

RBI: 147

SLG%: .646

OPS: 1.028


It would not be a list of the most dominant MLB hitting seasons without mentioning Ken Griffey Jr. Griffey led the American League in both home runs and RBIs in the 1997 season. 


His impressive season led him to win the 1997 AL MVP award.

Next18 / 21
Next19 / 21

3. Mark McGwire, 1998

AVG: .299

HR: 70

RBI: 147

SLG%: .752

OPS: 1.222


Though controversial, there is no denying Mark McGwire's 1998 season was ridiculous. While his RBIs were only a few behind Sammy Sosa (158), he led the league in home runs and set a then MLB single-season record. 


Some might not count this due to his admittance to steroid use during that season, there is no denying that he gave opposing pitchers nightmares the night before games.

Next19 / 21
Next20 / 21

2. Barry Bonds, 2001

AVG: .328

HR: 73

RBI: 137

SLG%: 752

OPS: 1.222


Bonds second appearance on this list is his infamous 2001 season. His 73 homers is still a single-season record that unbeatable to this day.


Bonds impressive play earned in NL MVP honors as well as a Silver Slugger and Hank Aaron award winner.

Next20 / 21
21 / 21

1. Babe Ruth, 1920

AVG: .376

HR: 54

RBI: 137

SLG%: .632

OPS: 1.382


In his second appearance on this list, Ruth had a ridiculous season in 1920. His 54 home runs led the league and the second highest? George Sisler with only 19. Yup, Babe Ruth was on another level during the 1920s. He also led the league in RBIs, slugging percentage and OPS, while having the fourth highest battling title.


Ruth's SLG% and OPS are each the second highest in a single season. Imagine how Ruth would have played in today's game.

21 / 21